Podcast show notes

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Dr. Dina Glouberman: The Joy of Burnout

Today’s interview is with Dina Glouberman, PhD.  She is a world expert in burnout, imagery and visualization, and author of three books, including The Joy of Burnout. She is also the creator of Imagework, a process that harnesses the imagination to uncover our deepest and truest dreams and carry them through to a new beginning.

Today we discuss:

  • How we become burned out
  • Why burnout is always your teacher
  • The symptoms of burnout
  • What burnout is telling you
  • Why using imagery is a great way to communicate with your truest self

Dr. Dina’s book, The Joy of Burnout, was invaluable during my recovery from burnout. I estimate that I have read it at least 10 times!

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Revive the Joy in Your Practice of Medicine: Part 4

Step 4: Let your patients take responsibility for their actions

We have spent many years in training and practice so that we would know the answers.  But sometimes patients can’t or won’t follow our advice. Now, more than ever, we know more and more about how to treat and prevent disease, and we want to communicate our knowledge to our patients.  We value health and we find it hard to understand when a patient does not follow our advice, because our patients’ health is so important to us.  This can be a major source of frustration.  In addition, if a patient does not follow our advice, we can feel as though it was a failure on our part. We can blame ourselves for what ultimately are our patient’s decisions.

Continue reading “Revive the Joy in Your Practice of Medicine: Part 4”

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Revive the Joy in Your Practice of Medicine: Part 3

Step 3:  Make the choice to avoid negative talk, negative self-talk, and complaining

This sounds simple, but is a habit that creeps up on you. It can be very insidious and is bad for your morale and others as well.  Negative talking actually makes your negative feelings worse, not better. You may temporarily feel better because you released some of your negative feelings, but ultimately it doesn’t help. Being pessimistic has negative effects on our physical health. It has been shown that people who are optimistic enjoy better health than those who are not.  Avoiding people who engage in these habits is important as well, because by their negativity they encourage you to be pessimistic. Last, but not least, by your example you encourage others to be negative as well.

Continue reading “Revive the Joy in Your Practice of Medicine: Part 3”

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Revive the Joy in Your Practice of Medicine: Part 2

Step 2:  Find your authentic self, and bring more of your authentic self to work

What is your authentic self?  Your authentic self is who you really are inside—your unique set of values, strengths and experiences.  When we experience frustration or discontent in our lives, it is often because whatever is going on or whatever we are doing is not congruent with our authentic self.  When we are living in harmony with who we really are inside, things really come alive for us.  We are happier and healthier, more energetic and optimistic. Continue reading “Revive the Joy in Your Practice of Medicine: Part 2”

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Revive the Joy in Your Practice of Medicine: Part 1

Do you recall graduating from medical school?  If you were like me, you felt the excitement of achieving our dreams, and the sense of accomplishment that you felt when you joined an elite group of professionals that are dedicated to the health of our fellow man.  Whether you knew it our not, you felt…inspired.  And you were inspiring to the people around you—to the ones that loved and supported you through school, your fellow students, our patients, and even your attending physicians, who saw your enthusiasm for the practice of medicine.

Being a physician can be wonderful.  The privilege of being able to care for people is a gift, and caring for people can be an experience that can fulfill us like no other experience can. Being a physician is also hard work. It challenges us physically, mentally, and emotionally. Continue reading “Revive the Joy in Your Practice of Medicine: Part 1”

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Thinking like a Leader: Using AND to Create Possibilities

As physicians, we are trained to solve problems based on evidence and what has worked previously  (the “standard of care”).  We take a constellation of facts—history, symptoms, clinical findings, and test results—and make it into a differential diagnosis, choose the most likely diagnosis, and proceed with treatment in the most prudent way.

This methodical, evidence based way of thinking and solving problems is also known as “either/or” thinking. Either/or thinking is integral to our practice of medicine and very valuable for our patients. The emphasis is on choosing just one of a set of limited answers to our question—e.g. what is the diagnosis? in order to move onward with further diagnosis and treatment in the most efficient way.

Either/or thinking serves us well when we solve clinical problems but often actually trips us up when it comes to solving problems in other arenas in our lives.

Continue reading “Thinking like a Leader: Using AND to Create Possibilities”